How To Identify & Crush Your Predominant Fault

In my last post I forced us all to consider our Big Kahuna of sin, our Grand Poobah of iniquity – our Predominant Fault.

It’s important because if we don’t fight it, we’re in big spiritual trouble. We’ll have no fertile interior life, which means no real spiritual growth.

So let’s turn our attention to how spiritual master Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange says we can identify, and then crush, this killer of souls.

6 Ways To Identify Your Predominant Fault

1. Ask God to show you. (Trust me…He’ll answer.) Ask for grace and then listen. And realize it might not even be God talking directly to you. Just by examining the things that pre-occupy your thoughts, especially during prayer, you can get a good bead on your major weaknesses.

Think about what issues or thoughts distract you the most when you’re trying to focus and recollect yourself. These are often strong indicators of what you need to work on because they’re items or issues that have a strong hold on your attention.

2. Ask “What makes me happy or sad?” (Add extra penance for any joyful response involving parachute pants or Zubaz.) Obviously, not everything that causes these emotions is a fault, but they can be clues.

3. AskWhat motivates my actions?” (Focus particularly my sinful motives.) Motive is huge. It’s the guard at the gate of the soul. If you can constantly monitor your motive (and be honest about it) you’ll be far better equipped to fight the spiritual battle.

Identifying your true motive will help you uncover your predominant fault very quickly.

4. What do others think is my Predominant Fault? If you’re married, you probably don’t need to ask. Your spouse has already told you (if your teenager hasn’t). If you’re unmarried or your spouse thinks you’re always totally awesome, ask a trusted friend or a spiritual director.

Regardless, others are more objective than we are when it comes to our weaknesses.

5. Ask yourself “What tempts me most?” “What is my weak area?” The Devil certainly knows, and is probably squeezing that pressure point pretty often. Pinpoint it. One way to do this is to think about what you’re always bringing up in confession.

6. Finally, Fr. Lagrange says that “in moments of true fervor the inspirations of the Holy Ghost ask us for the sacrifice of this particular fault.” If God is asking you do something like this, there’s a reason. Pray for grace to do what the Lord is asking of you.

So there you go – how to discover your Predominant Fault. But as GI Joe said back in the 80s cartoon, “knowing is only half the battle.”

The remaining question is “How do we kill it?”

3 Ways To Kill The Predominant Fault

You can’t combat your predominant fault without a healthy interior life. So here are the keys:

1. Sincere prayer. Blowing through a rosary isn’t going to cut it. We’re talking about real communication with God.

Pray something like – “Lord, help me get rid of anything and everything in my life that keeps me from you.” And mean it. In fact, you should meditate on it. (Check out my free guide, 8 Ways To Jumpstart Your Prayer Life for help on this one. It’s also the topic of the first video in my free Lenten streaming series – Catholic Mysticism & the Beautiful Life of Grace.)

And remember that prayer is meant to lead to action. If you’re going to ask God for it, you’ve got to act on the knowledge that he imparts. That’s the whole point of the grace he gives.

2. Examination of Conscience. Don’t just think about it. Write down how many times you fell to this fault. It’s like listing the checks written out of your bank account.

Falling to your predominant fault is like a big withdrawal from your spiritual savings account. You have to keep track so you can make a matching deposit. How? Look at number 3.

3. Do some penance. (Or as Fr. Lagrange puts it – “Impose a sanction.”) No pain, no gain” is just as true for spiritual workouts as it is in the sweaty world of Zumba. “This penance,” says Fr. Lagrange, “may take the form of prayer, a moment of silence, an exterior or interior mortification.”

And it’s better to do your penance now, rather than later. Why? Because the penance you do now has eternal merit due to the fact you’re making an act of the will. Anything that happens in purgatory doesn’t have merit because you have to suffer one way or the other.

Regardless of form, the penance you do should be “reparation for the fault and satisfaction for the penalty due it,” says Fr. Garrigou.

In other words, make the penance match the crime. (Don’t throw yourself into an Iron Maiden for 6 months because you lost patience yet again.)

Imposing a consequence for our repeated sin helps us to think twice before doing it again.

So there you go! Put these things into motion and you’re on your way to ridding yourself of your predominant fault!

But remember, it’s going to be hard. Your predominant fault doesn’t want to be unmasked and lose its hold on your life. But if you turn to Christ to help, you can do it.

Quoting St. Augustine, the Council of Trent declared, “God never commands the impossible; but in giving us His precepts, He commands us to do what we can, and to ask for the grace to accomplish what we cannot do.” Now git-r-dun!

God bless!

Matthew

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The Real Celebration of Love

You might think I’m crazy, but I think we should look at Lent in the same way that a lot of people look at St. Valentines’ Day.

Yep…you heard me.

In fact, I find it quite apropos that in most years, Valentine’s Day is celebrated in the “ominous” shadow of Lent.

Why? Because all the flowers and chocolates are symbols of exactly what Lent is all about – self-giving.

Our gifts to each other are evidence of love. To put it in heavier terms, they’re external actions that signify an interior reality. We physically demonstrate our love through gifts.

And that’s the heart of Lent.

But instead of giving Godiva and roses, we’re giving ourselves, which is exactly what we’re called to do.

“Greater love has no man than this,” says Christ, “that a man lay down his life for his friends” (John 15:13).

The penances we’ll undertake in just a few, short days aren’t meant to be drudgery. They’re meant to be sacrificial actions driven by love. “Love is the soul of sacrifice,” says Venerable Archbishop Fulton Sheen.

So when you really think about it, Lent is way more of a celebration of love than Valentines Day, or any other human holiday.

Because through it, we sacrificially demonstrate love to Our Lord, who out of incredible love did exactly the same thing for us on the Cross.

It’s all just something to keep in mind as you’re ponding possible penances this year.

God bless!

Matthew

P.S. If you’re looking for something really transformational to do this Lent, I’m offering a FREE Lenten video study titled “Catholic Mysticism & the Beautiful Life of Grace!” Part of the popular online series, the Science of Sainthood, it’s unlike any Lenten series you’ve ever done…and it’s absolutely free! CHECK IT OUT HERE!

The Tragic Beauty of the Cross

There is only one way to be saved….period.

“I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but by me.”

These words of Christ in John 14:6 are some of the most famous in all of Scripture.

But what most people don’t realize is that Christ declares them at the Last Supper, shortly before the start of his brutal Passion.

In fact, at the end of this chapter, he and the Disciples leave for the Garden of Gethsemane.

And understanding this context puts a little deeper spin on how we understand apply Christ’s declaration. This is no generic call to “seek Christ.”

It’s something far more intense.

He’s calling us to the tragic beauty of the Cross. He’s telling us that in order to be saved, we must be nailed to our crosses in union with His.

We must crush our self-love and mimic the humility of Christ, who

though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form he humbled himself and became obedient unto death, even death on a cross.”

Phil. 2:6-8

And realize that this union with the Cross – this dying to self – to which we’re called is not a one-time event.

It’s a daily picking up of our crosses and following Christ to Calvary.

St. John of the Cross describes our entire to journey to God as a kind of “Dark Night,” in which we are more and more conformed to the crucified Christ.

It sounds a bit scary, doesn’t it? But thank goodness, it’s not the end of the story.

The tragic beauty of the Cross lies in the fact that it’s only the first half of the story.

After the Crucifixion comes the Resurrection.

Good Friday is always followed by Easter. Salvation is at hand!

And the joy of our new life in Christ far outweighs the difficulties and crosses of this earthly life.

That’s the beauty of the Cross. It prepares us for eternal ecstasy.

As St. Paul declares in Romans 8:18, “I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us.”

So cling to the tragic beauty of the Cross of Christ! Don’t let go! The Son is on the horizon.

Have a blessed Triduum!

Matthew

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The most dynamic, clearest path to spiritual transformation you’ll find anywhere.” – Mike Aquilina, Author & EWTN Personality